Animation

Up is a 2009 American 3D computer-animated comedy-drama adventure film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. Carl, an old widower, goes off on an adventure in his flying house in search of Paradise Falls, his wife’s dream destination. While Pixar usually designs their characters to be caricatured, Carl was even more so, being only three heads high. He was not given elderly features such as liver spots or hair in his ears to keep him appealing, yet giving him wrinkles, pockmarks on his nose, a hearing aid, and a cane to make him appear elderly.

Docter wanted to push a stylized feel, particularly the way Carl’s head is proportioned: he has a squarish appearance to symbolize his containment within his house, while Russell is rounded like a balloon. The challenge on Up was making these stylized characters feel natural, although Docter remarked the effect came across better than animating the realistic humans from Toy Story, who suffered from the “uncanny valley”.  Other than this, a technical director worked out that to make Carl’s house fly, he would require 23 million balloons, but Docter realized that number made the balloons look like small dots. Instead, the balloons created were made to be twice Carl’s size. There are 10,927 balloons for shots of the house just flying, 20,622 balloons for the lift-off sequence, and a varying number in other scenes.

Animation

The animators did put tons of effort and technical increments to make the film look aesthetically pleasing to the audience. The best part was how effortless the animation in the film looked. The more the animation looks effortless and smooth the more is it tentative to attract the audience towards it.

“Up” is a wonderful film, with characters that are as believable as any characters can be who spend much of their time floating above the rain forests of Venezuela. They have tempers, problems and obsessions. They are cute and goofy, but they aren’t cute in the treacle way of little cartoon animals. They’re cute in the human way of the animation master Hayao Miyazaki. Two of the three central characters are cranky old men, which is a wonder in this youth-obsessed era. “Up” doesn’t think all heroes must be young or sweet, although the third important character is a nervy kid.

Now, the animators made it a point that the animation of this film reaches audience in such a manner that they love it for sure.

Advertisements